organic agriculture

PARTNERSHIP/AGENCY  ON ORGANIC AGRICULTURE AND BIODEGRADABLES  IS NEEDED. CONTACT <sfoodfeedf@yahoo.com> immediately

WHAT BUHARI SHOULD DO

ADVICE TO BUHARI

1 PREPARE A SYLLABUS OF YOUR PROGRAMME, POWER AND OIL SECTOR REFORMS SHOULD BE NUMBER 1

NUMBER 2 IS UNEMPLOYMENT

NUMBER 3 IS CORRUPTION

WHEN ALL THESE ARE ADDRESSED THEN WE CAN SCORED HIM AND MAKE A CONCLUSION WHETHER HE PERFORMED OR FAILED

OBITUARY

DR MRS EDEMA , FORMER EDITOR OF MYCOTOXIN NEWSLETTER DIED  EARLY LAST MONTH. MAY HER SOUL REST IN PEACE. INFORMATION ON HER CAN BE GOT FROM THE PRESIDENT, MYCOTOXIN SOCIETY OF NIGERIA, DR NEGEDU

LECTURE

INAUGURAL LECTURE TO TOUCH ON FOOD SAFETY COMES UP AT BABCOCK UNIVERSITY  IN MAY 2015. BE THERE

FOOD SAFETY IN NIGERIA

FEDERAL  GOVT SET UP 2 COMMITTEES ON FOOD SAFETY IN JANUARY 2015. GREAT NEWS. KENYAN GOVT COMMITTED MILLIONS OF SHILLINGS TO FIGHTING AFLATOXIN. HOW ABOUT NIGERIA?

NOTE TO BUHARI

General BuhaRI SHOULD FOCUS ON CONTAMINANT FREE FOOD AND FEED, THIS WILL REDUCE COST OF MEDICATION. FOOD SAFETY ACTIVISTS ARE WATCHING HIS STEPS. HE SHOULD ALSO WATCH HIS ‘FRIEND’S’ IN PARTY. SOME  ARE PRACTISING CROOKS AND INTERCONTINENTAL FRAUDSTERS

Aflatoxin Management In Nigeria: Role of Policy & Feedback

Introduction

  • Policy formulation entails analysis and authorization. It has to be:
  • effective i.e. valid, efficient and implementable and acceptable i.e arrived at through majority- building, making it politically feasible ANALYSIS + AUTHORIZATION = FORMULATION Feedback= Feedback is a process in which information about the past or the present influences the same phenomenon in the present or future.Interest is on Qualitative measurement i .e how good, bad, indifferent

 

CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

PACA ABUJA

short courses, Trainings, on Dair y cattle, milk processing, animal feed, pigs, poultr y and hor ticulture 2015=N E T H E R L A N D S F E L L O W S H I P P R O G R A M M E Sr

Please visit

www.ptcplus.com/~/…/trainingprogrammes_2014-2015_digitaal.ashx

 

or contact

Zandlaan 29
6717 LN Ede
P.O. Box 32
6710 BA Ede
The Netherlands
Phone: +31 (0)88 020 6400
Fax: +31 (0)88 020 6401
E-mail:
internationaloffice@ptcplus.com

 

 

2nd Annual Practical Short Course onFermentation and Separation for the Food & Drug Industries: Principle, Process, Recovery, and Product February 8-12, 2015

OBJECTIVES OF SHORT COURSE
 Provide practical training in the field of cell culture,
bioreactor operation, bioprocess paradigm, and
separation technology
 Increase understanding of the industrial food & drug
fermentation biotechnology through simulation,
sterilization technologies and clinical implications as
well as related research being done across different
countries, universities, and industries
 Review new technologies in the fermentation and
separation biotechnology industries and scale-up
bioreactor
 Establish network of academia and industry experts
LOCATION AND FACILITIES
All lectures will be held at TIPS (Texas A&M Institute
for Preclinical Studies) and NCTM (National Center
for Therapeutics Manufacturing) on the Texas A&M
University Campus.
ACCOMMODATIONS AND
TRANSPORTATION
Reservations for lodging should be made directly
by the attendee. A block of rooms has been reserved at
the College Station Hilton and Conference Center for
the short course participants at the special rate
of $115/night plus tax for single or double occupancy.
Ask for the rate specifically and mention the group
code “FERM15”. Hotel reservations must be received
before January 18, 2015 in order to get the
special rates. You can make your reservations by telephone,
fax, or internet. Check in time is 4:00 pm. Shuttle
service is provided from
Easterwood Airport to and from the Hilton Hotel.
Shuttle service can be arranged by calling the Hilton
(979) 693-7500.
Hilton College Station & Conference Center
801 University Dr. East, College Station, Texas 77840, USA
Tel: 979-693-7500
Fax: 979-260-1931
http://hiltoncs.com

 

REGISTRATION
Registration fee for the short course and pilot
plant demonstration is $1,495 if paid in full by January
18, 2015. After this date, registration fee is
$1,595. The registration fee for the short course includes
daily lunch, graduation lunch, refreshments at breaks, local
transportation, a short course e-manual, and certificate of
completion. A black & white paper manual/binder is available
for an additional $150 fee.
There is a 10% discount if three or more individuals
from the same organization register for the short course.
Academic discounts may be applicable if space is available.
Make checks payable to TEES (Texas A&M Engineering
Experiment Station) and mail to TEES Fiscal
Office, 3124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-
3124. Or you may pay the fee by credit card (American
Express, Visa, or Master Card) online.
Registration fees are not refundable, but substitute personnel
may be sent by the same firm.
Mail the registration form and a copy of your check
to Marcy Bundick, Short Course Coordinator (See address
on registration application form). Space is limited;
therefore, applications will be accepted on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
Marcy Bundick
Short Course Coordinator
Food Protein R&D Center
Phone: (979) 845-2741
Fax: (979) 845-2744
Email: shortcourse@tamu.edu
Dr. YongJae Lee
Head, Separation Sciences Program
Food Protein R&D Center
Phone: (979) 845-2758
Fax: (979) 845-2744
Email: yongjaelee@tees.tamus.edu

 

INSTRUCTORS

Instructors:
Daniel H. Bar, Vice President/General Manager, Amerida,
Division of Eurodia Industrie
Elizabeth Brunyak, Technical Sales Specialist, Pall Life
Sciences
Donald F. Day, Professor, Audubon Sugar Institute, Louisiana
State University
Arum Han, Associate Professor, Director of NanoBio
Systems Lab, Texas A&M University
Joan R. Hernandez, Technical Lab Coordinator, NCTM,
Texas A&M University
Loe Hubbard, Global Applications Manager, Pall Life Sciences
Osama O. Ibrahim, Consultant Biotechnology, Bio Innovation
Matthew Johnson, Technical Laboratory Coordinator,
NCTM, Texas A&M University
Jiyoung Lee, Marketing Manager, BioProcess, GE
Healthcare
YongJae Lee, Head of Separation Sciences Program,
Food Protein R&D Center, Texas A&M University
Ken Mabery, Manager – Western US, Pall Life Sciences
Kevin Marino, Manager – Eastern US, Pall Life Sciences
Dharti Pancholi, Senior Process Engineer, P&F Engineering
NNE Pharmaplan
Michael V. Pishko, Professor, Biomedical Engineering,
Texas A&M University; Director of the NCTM (National
Center for Therapeutics Manufacturing)
J. Stefan Rokem, Associate Professor, Department of
Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Hebrew University—
Hadassah Medical School
Byron Sample, Field Application Scientist, BioProcess,
GE Healthcare
Christiane Waldron, Senior Engineering Manager,
Kaneka North America LLC
2nd Annual Practical Short Course on
Organized by the
Separation Science Program
Food Protein Research & Development Center
The Texas A&M University System
College Station, Texas 77843-2476 U.S.A.
In Cooperation with
National Center for Therapeutics Manufacturing
Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station
The Texas A&M University System
College Station, Texas 77843-4482 U.S.A.
Fermentation and Separation for the
Food & Drug Industries:
Principle, Process, Recovery, and Product
February 8-12, 2015
REGISTRATION
Registration fee for the short course and pilot
plant demonstration is $1,495 if paid in full by January
18, 2015. After this date, registration fee is
$1,595. The registration fee for the short course includes
daily lunch, graduation lunch, refreshments at breaks, local
transportation, a short course e-manual, and certificate of
completion. A black & white paper manual/binder is available
for an additional $150 fee.
There is a 10% discount if three or more individuals
from the same organization register for the short course.
Academic discounts may be applicable if space is available.
Make checks payable to TEES (Texas A&M Engineering
Experiment Station) and mail to TEES Fiscal
Office, 3124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-
3124. Or you may pay the fee by credit card (American
Express, Visa, or Master Card) online.
Registration fees are not refundable, but substitute personnel
may be sent by the same firm.
Mail the registration form and a copy of your check
to Marcy Bundick, Short Course Coordinator (See address
on registration application form). Space is limited;
therefore, applications will be accepted on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
Marcy Bundick
Short Course Coordinator
Food Protein R&D Center
Phone: (979) 845-2741
Fax: (979) 845-2744
Email: shortcourse@tamu.edu
Dr. YongJae Lee
Head, Separation Sciences Program
Food Protein R&D Center
Phone: (979) 845-2758
Fax: (979) 845-2744
Email: yongjaelee@tees.tamus.edu

Nigeria scandalously silent on GM –Fapohunda

Prof Dele Fapohunda, a Food and Feed Safety activist, Founder and President, Safe Food and Feed Foundation, is an ardent advocate of safe foods. In this interview with News Editor, ONCHE ODEH, he decries the quietness of Nigerian government and experts over issues of Genetic Modification (GM) of foods, despite evidences that they are flooding the country, among other issues on the global GM controversies. Excerpts.   

What do you make of the controversies surrounding Genetically Modified (GM) Foods?

First, let us start with the genesis of all this. The project started in the 1960s when attention of the financiers was focused on the hungry millions of people in India, Mexico, the Philippines and Africa. High yielding varieties of rice and wheat were to be developed with genetic modification, and heavy input of fertilisers, herbicides and pesticides. This is why the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) was formed in the Philippines. It was alleged that widespread corruption and insecurity were twin factors that did not allow the experiment to succeed in Africa. The Consultative Group on International Agriculture (CGIAR), a research and aid organisation, has been very active and visible in the initiative that concentrated on producing high yielding varieties. This commendable initiative of reducing starvation among the world s poor then by experts was led by Norman Borlaug, now called the father of Green Revolution. As we speak, some countries are large producers and major world exporters of the monocultutres and many ready-to-eat foods, which are now GM.

Why is the project being opposed now?

Opponents insist that the foods are unnatural and an unacceptable because they meddle with the natural biological processes. They therefore continued to create a ‘fear effect’ in the mind of consumers. Many citizen groups are daily calling for Genetic Engineering (GE)- free zones around the world and vote instead for conventional organic agriculture. Health and environmental concerns have heightened of recent, with Rights groups taking many governments to court. This has happened in USA and in the Philippines. Although they noted that increased food production meant people no longer die of hunger, they, however, are dying of malnutrition as some of the new improved varieties lack essential nutrients like iron and vitamin A resulting in food and nutrition related morbidities.  Since this form of agriculture also depends on huge doses of pesticides and fertilisers, death of fish, as well as health impacts  to human consumers through allergies and cancers are equal sources of concern. Pesticide residues are regularly monitored by the WHO and FAO because built-in pesticides cannot be removed from agric produce.  Also this large input of petrochemicals and emergence of secondary pests, which ultimately shoot up production costs has widened the gap between the rich and poor. The emerging economic challenge has led to the migration of small holder farmers and landless farm workers to urban settlements.

Is it true GM foods are being rejected?

That s very correct, and there are practical cases of rejection of GM corn from one country by another. Hormone – fattened cattle are also being rejected in Europe. This year, the government of Hungary destroyed thousand s of GM corn fields and gone proceeded to tighten control as dairy cow feeds. Sometimes the protests have gone violent, for example, a wheat farm was destroyed by protesters in Australia in 2011. Vandalism against the experimental stations was also reported in the Philippines in 2013. Such violent act on laboratories, and field experimental stations had also happened in the USA and Europe. There are many non-violent groups like Friends of the Earth, Union of Concerned Scientists, Food and Waterwatch, Institute of Responsible Technology, Organic Consumers Association.

But supporters have continued to allay fears?

Yes, supporters have accused opponents of relying on results of unverified junk research. There are recent researches on animal field trials citing many feeding studies conducted by public research laboratories which concluded that there are no safety problems linked to long-term consumption of genetically modified food. The anti GM activists had advised that GM food should be banned, or accordingly labelled to afford consumers the opportunity to make choices. In what speaks of the contrary, a report quoted, Hamburg, a very senior official of the FDA in March as saying that the FDA hasn’t changed its position on GMOs, despite two decades’ worth of studies linking GMOs, and the pesticides and herbicides required to grow them, to everything from allergies to cancer, Hamburg said the FDA has “not found evidence of safety risks” associated with GMOs. Therefore there is no need to specially label GM food as so.

Sincerely, what do you think is the future of GM?

That is a difficult question for me because a highly probing review of the Green Revolution package has revealed a tough divergence of opinions, each  equally seemingly convincing. Intricacies and complexities involved in assessment of food security have thrown up bitter divergence in the role of a critical aspect of Green Revolution. The vehement and frontally tendentious divide is capable of threatening the financial base of some international companies and capable of rocking the political stability of the world if not well managed. Remember that big names and corporate bodies are involved. Money and politics are twin characters on the table that serve as platform of presentation that paraded the potential of blinding and neutralising each side of the argument. Huge financial commitment has been made over the years and such investment cannot just be overlooked by any latter-day criticism. But the question remains: Can we say the conception and execution of the project is sincere, ab initio? Sometimes the claims and counter claims can be alarming with profound implications for example the opponents insisted that contrary to claims, it is indeed scientifically proven that the dangers and long term health implications far outweigh so called benefits. 

But Norman Bourlaug, the brilliant man at the centre dismissed negative claims as ranting of the uninformed,  describing the critics as armchair  opponents  who never witnessed nor experience penury and hunger. He believed that if they lived just one month amid the misery of the developing world, as he did for fifty years, they’d be crying out for tractors and fertiliser and irrigation canals and be outraged that fashionable elitists back home were trying to deny them these things. He admitted the project has not turned the world into a Utopia, but equally insisting that it was a step in the right direction

What is the position of Nigeria on this?

Many countries are involved in the two sides. These include France, Finland, India, Switzerland, Peru, Italy, Greece, Spain, Austria, Russia, Australia, Hungary and South Africa. I am not sure of the stand of Nigerian government, scientists and the business group on this. And this loud silence to me is scandalous, when one considers the rate at which many GM foods flood Nigeria. Meanwhile, this scientific and economic battle rage in other parts of the world, and Nigeria still continues to battle with issues of corruption and insecurity, unfortunately the twin factors that enhance national retrogression I just got a report now that the next phase of the Green Revolution is targeting Africa, through a grain research centre in Mexico, and that could be sooner than expected. Are we ready to accept or criticise, based on verifiable facts? Food safety activists like ours will do their best to sensitise Nigerians and we are open to collaboration with similar minds in this crusade