CONFERENCE ON ORGANIC FARMING AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

A gathering of experts and stakeholders in organic farming will take place in Luxembourg July 18-19, 2019

For more please visit

https://www.omicsonline.org/conferences-list/post-harvest-technology-and-processing

2/2019

Call for experts for the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Meetings on Nutrition (JEMNU) on nitrogen to protein conversion factors for soy-based and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas

Deadline for submission: 1 March 2019
Background

The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Meetings on Nutrition (JEMNU) was established in 2012 to provide scientific advice to the committees of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme (i.e. Codex Alimentarius) or Member Countries. JEMNU aims to provide relevant scientific advice in an independent and cost-effective manner; therefore, the Meetings will be convened when there is a specific request from a Codex Committee or Member Countries.

Currently being discussed at the Codex Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNFSDU) is the most appropriate nitrogen to protein conversion factor (or factors) to use in estimating protein content of soy-based ingredients and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas. To provide guidance on this topic, at the 39th Session of CCNFSDU in 2017, the Committee requested that JEMNU be convened to review the evidence and develop evidence-informed guidance regarding nitrogen to protein conversion factors. (To facilitate the work of JEMNU, a systematic review is currently being conducted to compile and analyse the available data on nitrogen to protein conversion factors for foods containing soy-based and/or milk-based ingredients.)

FAO and WHO have therefore initiated the convening of JEMNU and are in the process of identifying experts with relevant knowledge and experiences to participate in the expert meeting to be held during 15 – 19 July 2019 (exact dates to be confirmed). The selected experts will review the evidence to establish appropriate nitrogen to protein conversion factors for soy-based and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas.
Desired expertise

Successful candidates should meet most or all of the following qualifications:

Experience in research and application of methodologies for assessing protein quality and quantity in foods, particularly those containing soy- and milk-based ingredients;
Good knowledge of the English language, both written and oral;
Ability to prepare scientific documents and to work in an international environment with scientists from various disciplines;
Recent, relevant scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals is desirable;
Leadership, or invited participation, in national or international scientific bodies, committees and other expert advisory bodies pertinent to the scope of this work is desirable.

Expert activities

Experts will be expected to actively engage in:

reviewing and interpreting the evidence;
establishing recommended conversion factors;
contributing to the development of a report summarizing the discussion and outcomes of the meeting; and
reviewing the final report.

The meeting report, including recommended conversion factors, will be made available to the 41st Session of CCNFSDU to be held in November 2019.

Source=https://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/callforexperts-JEMNU-Feb2019/en/
Dele Fap
2 2019

KENYA REPORTS AFLATOXIN IN UGALI, MILK and MEAT

Kenya has been mapped as an aflatoxin hotspot, a leading cause of liver cancer, hiding in grains like maize and animal food products.

Findings of a study released last month by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) showed a large amount of milk and grains consumed by Kenyans have aflatoxin levels exceeding internationally accepted limit.

Aflatoxin is a tasteless poison produced by Aspergillus flavus fungus caused by a mould in soil that commonly affect cereals. It is mostly passed to humans through animal food products or direct ingestion of affected crops.

The study dubbed “Measuring and mitigating risk of mycotoxins in maize and dairy products for poor consumers in Kenya” was done from samples of of livestock feeds collected from farmers in five counties.

Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation director general Eliud Kireger however dismissed the report as alarmist, saying that most Kenyans could have died if that was the case

For more info, please visit https://www.the-star.co.ke/news/2018/07/07/beware-aflatoxin-in-ugali-milk-and-meat-could-be-killing-you_c1782173

2 2019

MYCOTOXIN SCARE—-MOLDCID TO THE RESCUE ?????

Moldcid, an intervention by a German company is reported to be able to prevent mould growth on crops in store. It has as ia component , propionic acid, which is common preservative that is GRAS and constitute no danger to human health. The acid comes as a salt and so has no corrosive ability
For some time now, aflatoxin menace on crops in A frica is a source of concern
One advantage of MOLDCID is that no residual mouldiness is on the crops, in contrast to some ‘fungus fight’ biological control strategies

The effectiveness of this product will be assessed particularly the long term use , by farmers, exporters and other stakeholders before it can be totaaly embraced

DELE
NOV 2018

DICHLORVOS SCARE HEIGHTENS NIGERIA FOOD SAFETY ALARM

Few weeks ago m the social mdia was awash with videos of some youths spraying what was understood to be DDVP on dried beans
The chemical also called dichlorvos, is the culprit that sentenced Nigeria to about 4 year ban from the European Union. It will be recalled that DICHLORVOS, has been declared not safe in a EU document published in 2012. Having considered human and environmental risk assessment, the chemical was labelled as ‘showing potential and unacceptable RISK’ as a biocidal chemical.
By next year, 2019, the ba on Nigerian dried beans in EU is due for review. The present incident will surely put in focus Nigeria s seriuosness and readiness about being brought back to engage in fair international agro-trade . Measures put in place wil be reviewed. These principally are captured under the ZERO REJECT initiative driven by Federal Ministriesm like Agric and Health; and Agencies like UNIDO

It is clear that more attention will have to be on Extension measures that will spread the new interventions aimed at wholesome agro produce for local consumption and export

Dele FRapohunda
Nov 2018

Celebrating our star member—-Funmilola Asani

The Safe Food and Feed Foundation celebrates our star member Miss Funmilola Asani. As a young lawyer, she display a strong passion for volunteering and in a short time , made herself visible in the Foundation. She was a strategic player and organizer who made it possible for the ‘Train the Trainers’ workshop held early in the month
We recognize and are proud of her talent and drive, which are qualities that will always make her attractive to any international platform having human health development as its main goal

DF Oct 2018

Strategies for fighting aflatoxin—-

An award winning writer,Charles W. Schmidt, discussed the latest biological control measure aimed at fighting toxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus, that produces aflatoxn. He discussed the collaboration between Dr Cotty and Dr Bandyophadyay

For more , visit
https://en.engormix.com/mycotoxins/articles/breaking-mold-new-strategies-t42751.htm?utm_source=campaign&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=0-0-0

DF 2018

Poverty and the consumption of unsafe food are relatives–News

The consumption of unsafe food items like the ones laden with aflatoxin and pesticides is a sign of malnutrition. Malnutrition itself is an emblem of poverty.

For more on this report, please visit

DF Oct 2018

NIGERIAN NATIONAL FOOD SAFETY POLICY–HOW FAR ON IMPLEMENTATION ???

In 2014 there was a National Food Safety policy published by the Federal Ministry of Health. The document highlighted the risk associated with unwholesome food consumption and designed a road map for intervention.
Nigerians were then reminded that ‘governments need to give food safety just as much attention as they devote to quality and safety of pharmaceutical products; not everyone needs to take medicine every day but all people need food, each and every day’

For a copy of the full report, Kindly visit
http://extwprlegs1.fao.org/docs/pdf/nig151436.pdf

Is the govt making progress in the steps expected to be taken by all stakeholders ?
We need your feedback

DF Oct 2018

SFFF MARKS 2018 DAY AGAINST EXTREME POVERTY

On Thursday 18 October, 2018 the Safe Food and Feed Foundation held a Train the Trainers workshop. It was to mark the International Day against Extreme Poverty, which was a day earlier, Oct 17. The consumption of unwholesome food is a form of malnutrition, which is an emblem of poverty

The one-hour event featured a lecture by Prof Dele Fapohunda. Participants, whose minimum qualification was a first degree, were drawn from the Remo District of Ogun state. Both youth and women were represented.

Participants were briefed on the role of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin, in human health and export value of commodities. They were told that the EU put in place a RASFF programme that monitors crop shipments destined for member countries. On many occasions exporting countries have had their products rejected at the point of delivery. Other contaminants like pesticides were mentioned and treated. Participants were informed that, at present, Nigeria is experiencing a ban on dried beans from the European Union, EU due to unacceptable levels of dichlorvos. The ban is due for review in 2019

The next workshop will treat Pesticides and with resource persons from government field officers, regulatory agencies and the academia

The workshop  will be continuous exercise

For further information on next host venue and other issues, please contactsfoodfeedf@gmail.com

Or

08033709492